“We wouldn’t get the quality results without them.”

We get a lot of interest on a regular basis from patients and followers asking about the intricate removal and planting of hair grafts.

Our very own senior nurse Joanne Scannell loves to inform our patients about the geeky stuff – as most of our followers already know.

Here she tells us about Zeiss Magnification Loupes, Joanne said: “At the Glasgow Clinic we use Zeiss Magnification Surgical Loupes because we make very small incisions during our FUE procedures.

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“Our incision sizes are point zero zero six millimetres in width by zero point nine to one point four millimetres in length, depending on the size of the individual hair.

“We make the blade ourselves and it’s slightly bigger than the individual hair. This is important in order to plant the hair without damaging it. Accuracy is vital.

“The operation is all about precision. If you don’t use magnification you can’t see in enough detail to competently pack all of the grafts into a dense area.

“There is also more likelihood that the grafts will be damaged and if they are, then this adversely effects the outcome of the operation as well as the density and quality of subsequent hair growth.

“A damaged graft can also result in frizzy hair growth which is not an outcome we tolerate at the Glasgow Clinic.

“It may seem a little nerdy but experience has taught me that these details are of huge significance for the outcome of the procedure.

“Once the loupes are on, what looks like a small scratch on the skin is amplified, as it might be in 3D and this allows us to plant the grafts without any damage.”

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Here at the Glasgow Clinic we also have a policy of single-action planting.

Joanne said: “When the graft is collected from the holding solution we plant it directly and in one complete motion without touching the bulb of the hair or the sides of the incision. The bulb is where the growth comes from and can be easily damaged if over-handled.

“Again, the magnification helps us to perform this deftly and swiftly, ensuring the quality of hair-growth.

“It is so important that we don’t damage any of the native hair, any of the tissue or the grafts themselves. Damaged grafts simply do not grow as well as healthy terminal hair; they can lose their colour cells and sometimes become very dry because the sebaceous glands, the cells that oil the hair have been compromised.

“The Zeiss magnification loupes are expensive and are actual surgeons loupes but we insist all of our staff at the Glasgow Clinic wear them.

“We wouldn’t be able to handle the small grafts that we do without the loupes nor we we get such excellent post-procedure outcomes.”

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