Weclome to the Glasgow Clinic blog

Welcome to the Glasgow Clinic blog. We hope that you find what we post on here informative in your search for answers relating to hair loss and hair transplants.

Scotland is lacking in information for those suffering from hair loss so we hope that our blog will provide a reliable source on a personal level to those battling against it and in search of a solution.

We want to share experiences and stories of our patients and give you an insight into what the procedure involves. We aim to raise awareness of how the hair transplant industry has advanced over the past decade and help people talk about hair loss to remove the stigma that surrounds those trying to tackle male and female pattern baldness.

For us here at the GC it’s not just about vanity. Losing your hair gradually over time or suddenly due to an illness or medical condition, can have an emotional and physical effect on any sufferer.

We often have consultations with burns victims and cancer patients who have suffered hair loss because of their medical condition or accident. We treat each case confidentially and on its own merit. We always endeavour to give the best and honest advice we can.

All the best,

Fraser and the GC team.

GC logo cutting

The Glasgow Clinic is the first hair transplant clinic in the country to be regulated by Health Improvement Scotland

We know you’ll want to hear our fantastic news. If you haven’t heard already – the Glasgow Clinic is the only hair transplant clinic in Scotland to be officially regulated under Health Improvement Scotland’s new legislation.

The new legislation has been introduced to protect patients who undergo cosmetic and minor surgical procedures such as hair transplants.

Healthcare Improvement Scotland started regulating independent clinics back in April 2016 and have given a deadline of the 1st of April 2017 for clinics to become fully registered. screen-shot-2017-02-27-at-13-48-40

Our Clinic Director, Fraser Christensen said: “This new legislation is what we’ve been needing within our industry for a long time.

“There are far too many irresponsible hair transplant clinics out there targeting vulnerable young men and using sales techniques and sharp practice to take their money.

“They use pay as you go schemes and carry procedures out on patients who don’t necessarily need a hair transplant. It pains me and the team here at the Glasgow Clinic when we see what’s happening within our industry.

“Up to ten percent of our work involves improving and repairing poor hair transplants carried out by other clinics. Hair transplant surgery is not for everyone and patients should be informed of all the options open to them.

“Thirty percent of all our potential patients may be unsuitable. It could be that they’re too young for the procedure, it’s too early for them or they don’t have a sufficient donor area.

“We make sure we give all our patients the space and time to reflect on whether they want to go ahead with a hair transplant and what it involves.

“We have strict medical procedures in place and a medical team that have an impeccable reputation with over twenty years’ experience within the hair transplant industry.

“Hopefully this new legislation will make clinics accountable and cut out the bad practice within our industry in Scotland.

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“Patients need to be aware that clinics they visit must be registered under Healthcare Improvement Scotland and any clinic not registered by 1st April 2017 could be subject to a five thousand pound fine or possibly imprisonment.

“We carry out the FUE (Follicular Unit Extraction) hair transplant procedure at our clinic. It’s the most advanced form of hair transplants and is technically more challenging, but far less invasive than the old strip (FUT) procedure.

“It’s now more affordable and certainly from our own perspective because of the results we’ve achieved over the past few years, it’s never been more popular and we currently have the longest waiting list in the UK.

“It’s very important for us to create a relationship with our patients, manage their expectations and make sure they understand what can be achieved when undergoing a hair transplant.

“The industry is developing all the time and we can’t express enough to those who are seeking a hair loss solution that choosing a reputable clinic with proven results is very important.”

Claire Sweeney, Interim Director of Quality Assurance for Healthcare Improvement Scotland, said: “The Glasgow Clinic has not been slow to recognise the importance of registering with us and the benefits this will bring for their clients.

“Regulation has been introduced in Scotland to help improve safety for those people who use independent clinics and to ensure that clinics continue to improve the services that they provide.

“We look forward to welcoming many more clinics between now and the end of March.”

“The active ingredient nourishes and stimulates the hair follicles.”

We try to keep you updated with interesting blog posts and answer as many of your queries as possible. One of the things we are often asked about is Rogaine – the first FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved treatment that is clinically proven to regrow hair.

Our medical director, Dr James McKelvie, gives us a little insight into the benefits of using Minoxidil.

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Dr McKelvie said: “Rogaine contains the active ingredient Minoxidil, the only over-the-counter treatment clinically proven to help prevent further hair loss.

“Minoxidil works by helping the blood flow to the hair follicles. It increases follicular size and hair shaft diameter stimulating, and prolonging hair growth.

“It was discovered during clinical trials for high blood pressure treatment. During the trials it showed signs of being able to regrow hair.

rogaine_1024x1024“Minoxidil promotes hair regrowth in four different ways. It reverses miniaturisation of follicles and increases blood flow around the follicles. It also stimulates follicle movement from resting to hair growth phase and extends each follicle’s growth phase.”

There is a benefit to using minoxidil six months prior to your FUE (Follicular Unit Extraction) hair transplant. Why is it a benefit? Potentially it can reduce the amount of shedding and it can encourage early regrowth after a hair transplant.

Dr McKelvie said: “In our experience here at the Glasgow Clinic, the active ingredient within the product nourish and stimulate the hair follicles.

“A hair transplant will not stop you losing more natural hair but for eighty percent of males who use minoxodil it could stop further hair loss or significantly slow down hair loss.

“For patients, holding on to any percentage of their existing hair can notably improve the cosmetic result from the hair transplant.

“Sixty percent of our patients will take minoxidil post-op because they’ve spent a lot of effort on their hair and not because the implanted hairs are dependent on it.

“If they can prevent further thinning of the natural hair for a small outlay then it should be considered.”

To purchase Rogaine in the Glasgow Clinic online shop visit: http://www.theglasgowclinicshop.co.uk

Queen of the South goalie Lee Robinson’s eight month update

We know a few of our followers have been eagerly waiting on Lee’s images – we don’t like to keep you waiting.

Lee was more than happy to share with us his 8 month update.

He’s happy – we’re happy!

There’s more to come in the New Year so make sure you check back with us.

All the best,

The GC team.

Lee - before image

Lee – before image

Lee - before image

Lee – before image

Lee - 8 month update 1,801 FUE grafts

Lee – 8 month update 1,801 FUE grafts

Lee - 8 month update 1,801 FUE grafts

Lee – 8 month update 1,801 FUE grafts

 

Most people don’t realise but hairs come in all shapes and sizes.

In our last update from our senior nurse, Joanne, she chatted about our use of the Zeiss Magnification Loupes. This was only one example of why the Glasgow Clinic is set apart from other clinics.

Here at the GC, we really enjoy giving our patients as many details as possible. It’s important they understand the complexities and intricacies of their procedure as it demystifies what we do and empowers the patient with knowledge and confidence.

It also helps our patients understand how we can achieve such great results.

Our Joanne is back again with a bit more geeky stuff for you. Here she gives us a little insight into the hair transplant design.

Joanne explains: “The designing of the hair involves many factors and skill-sets in order to achieve a great outcome.

“Most people don’t realise this but hairs come in all shapes and sizes, not just colours and textures.

“From each hair bulb only one hair will grow, this is known as a follicular unit.

“However, its common that several hairs can be clustered together in one follicular unit and linked by a bundle of collagen with one sebaceous gland.

“As part of the procedure we have to collate how many single hair follicular units we have along with how many double, triple and quadruple hairs there are. This has to be done microscopically.

“It’s extremely important, as not all of the different types of follicular units can be planted in the same place on the scalp.

“During the design of the individual transplant, we have to be aware that planting for example quadruple bundles of follicular units at the front of the hairline would look unnatural, as this would not occur in nature.

“As we work we can chose which particular hair types we want to harvest for the area that requires them. So we can plant single units at the hairline and quadruple units for density in the mid-scalp area.”

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The work at the Glasgow Clinic is very bespoke and is dependent on what the patient is looking for.

Joanne said: “If density is the most important feature of the hair design then we can target the double, triple and quadruple grafts.

“If the hairline is the focus we will target predominately single follicular units but we would also harvest doubles for the area behind the hairline to assist with a delicate density, as we would find in nature.

“Colour is also another significant and important factor as well as texture and strength but these issues will be for further blogs.”

Our Joanne will be back with more updates in the coming weeks and months so keep checking back with us. We know how much you love it!

The GC Team

9 month update for FUE Glasgow Clinic patient

Hi folks,

We have a few images for you to see. Before and after images for our 37-year-old male who visited us only just 9 months ago. The patient who is from Glasgow was delighted to show us his new hairline and regrowth.

Have a look!

The GC team

37 year-old pre-op

37 year-old pre-op

37-year-old 9 months update (1,794 FUE grafts)

37-year-old 9 months update (1,794 FUE grafts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

37-year-old pre-op

37-year-old pre-op

37-year-old 9 months update (1,794 FUE grafts)

37-year-old 9 months update (1,794 FUE grafts)

“We wouldn’t get the quality results without them.”

We get a lot of interest on a regular basis from patients and followers asking about the intricate removal and planting of hair grafts.

Our very own senior nurse Joanne Scannell loves to inform our patients about the geeky stuff – as most of our followers already know.

Here she tells us about Zeiss Magnification Loupes, Joanne said: “At the Glasgow Clinic we use Zeiss Magnification Surgical Loupes because we make very small incisions during our FUE procedures.

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“Our incision sizes are point zero zero six millimetres in width by zero point nine to one point four millimetres in length, depending on the size of the individual hair.

“We make the blade ourselves and it’s slightly bigger than the individual hair. This is important in order to plant the hair without damaging it. Accuracy is vital.

“The operation is all about precision. If you don’t use magnification you can’t see in enough detail to competently pack all of the grafts into a dense area.

“There is also more likelihood that the grafts will be damaged and if they are, then this adversely effects the outcome of the operation as well as the density and quality of subsequent hair growth.

“A damaged graft can also result in frizzy hair growth which is not an outcome we tolerate at the Glasgow Clinic.

“It may seem a little nerdy but experience has taught me that these details are of huge significance for the outcome of the procedure.

“Once the loupes are on, what looks like a small scratch on the skin is amplified, as it might be in 3D and this allows us to plant the grafts without any damage.”

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Here at the Glasgow Clinic we also have a policy of single-action planting.

Joanne said: “When the graft is collected from the holding solution we plant it directly and in one complete motion without touching the bulb of the hair or the sides of the incision. The bulb is where the growth comes from and can be easily damaged if over-handled.

“Again, the magnification helps us to perform this deftly and swiftly, ensuring the quality of hair-growth.

“It is so important that we don’t damage any of the native hair, any of the tissue or the grafts themselves. Damaged grafts simply do not grow as well as healthy terminal hair; they can lose their colour cells and sometimes become very dry because the sebaceous glands, the cells that oil the hair have been compromised.

“The Zeiss magnification loupes are expensive and are actual surgeons loupes but we insist all of our staff at the Glasgow Clinic wear them.

“We wouldn’t be able to handle the small grafts that we do without the loupes nor we we get such excellent post-procedure outcomes.”

“The grafts are incised into the appropriate area to allow the hair transplant to mimic nature.”

“The grafts are incised into the appropriate area to allow the hair transplant to mimic nature.”

A Glasgow Clinic update from our Senior Nurse Joanne Scannell. Screen shot 2016-02-17 at 11.39.51

We know how much you – our followers love to read about the geeky stuff. Here at the Glasgow Clinic we research and continually evolve our procedures to benefit the patient and make sure we keep up-to-date with industry developments.

Discussing the importance of blade size during an FUE (Follicular Unit Extraction) hair transplant, Joanne said: “During an FUE hair transplant the blades we use for making the incisions are designed to cause as little damage as possible to the recipient area of the patient.

“The width of the blade is 0.006mm and the length depends on where in the head we are making the incision.

“If the incision is on the hairline, the blade can be as small as 0.9mm. Around the transition zone (where the follicles are replanted) the blade is usually about 1.1-1.2mm and for any larger grafts we will use a 1.4-1.5mm blade.

“The size of the blades ensure that the grafts are incised into the appropriate area to allow the hair transplant to mimic nature by going from fine hairline to density.

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“The blades also ensure that a minimal amount of damage is done to the scalp so that at the end of the surgery and post-operative when the scalp comes to heal, it only has to heal a minor wound.

“The scalp won’t grow a graft until it heals the wound. So any damage done to the area has to be repaired before the blood supply will attach to the follicle.”

Our Joanne has worked in the hair transplant industry for twenty years and brings a wealth of practical skills and managerial experience.

Check back soon for lots more updates and of course the geeky stuff.

All the best,

The GC Team